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Tsering Topgyal Contemporary Issues photos

Tsering has very kindly donated 10 limited edition signed prints to help raise money for Tibet Relief Fund, on this page you can buy them. The 30cm x 40cm photos are signed and dated on the back, are already framed (42cm x 52.5cm) and come with a card on the back detailing the story behind the photo. There is only one of each photo available.

Read more: Young Tibetan photographer Tsering Topgyal pictures a bright future

Tsering signing the photos.
Tsering signing the photos.
TT signature
signed and dated
Photos come framed
Photos come framed
Photos come framed
Photos come framed

Select a photo (price includes postage*)




*Includes UK postage, please email [email protected] if you are overseas.

Kalsang, 19, poses for a photo at a Tibetan college library near Dharmsala, India. She escaped from Tibet into India in 2004 and says she misses her parents more as she grows older. Kalsang is currently studying Buddhism and says it helps her understand the world and to be in control of her emotions.
PHOTO 1 Kalsang, 19, poses for a photo at a Tibetan college library near Dharmsala, India. She escaped from Tibet into India in 2004 and says she misses her parents more as she grows older. Kalsang is currently studying Buddhism and says it helps her understand the world and to be in control of her emotions.

Namdak Choeying, 44, prays in her small room that she shares with two other nuns in Dharmsala, India. Back home in Tibet she aspired to be a fully ordained nun and escaped to India in 2006. Her five siblings and aged parents live in Tibet and she dreams about meeting them. Choeying said she immerses herself in prayers to keep her mind occupied.
SOLD – PHOTO 2 Namdak Choeying, 44, prays in her small room that she shares with two other nuns in Dharmsala, India. Back home in Tibet she aspired to be a fully ordained nun and escaped to India in 2006. Her five siblings and aged parents live in Tibet and she dreams about meeting them. Choeying said she immerses herself in prayers to keep her mind occupied.
Tashi Dorjee 27, sits in a coffee shop in Dharmsala, India. He fled with his brother as a four-year-old in 1991. Dorjee says he missed his parents most when he was in school, especially when everyone went home for winter vacation as he had no home to go to. He says because of time and distance there is no attachment with family and parents.
SOLD PHOTO 3 Tashi Dorjee 27, sits in a coffee shop in Dharmsala, India. He fled with his brother as a four-year-old in 1991. Dorjee says he missed his parents most when he was in school, especially when everyone went home for winter vacation as he had no home to go to. He says because of time and distance there is no attachment with family and parents.
A 27-year-old Tibetan boy, who did not want to disclose his identity, sits in his room in New Delhi, India. He escaped into India in 1992 and says the 22 years away from his family has made him strong and emotionless. His mother has grown old and conveys her yearning to meet him but he doubts whether he will get a visa. The Tibetan says he misses his parents when he watches family.
PHOTO 4 A 27-year-old Tibetan boy, who did not want to disclose his identity, sits in his room in New Delhi, India. He escaped into India in 1992 and says the 22 years away from his family has made him strong and emotionless. His mother has grown old and conveys her yearning to meet him but he doubts whether he will get a visa. The Tibetan says he misses his parents when he watches family.
Sonam Dolma, 75, poses near a prayer wheel in Dharamsala, India. Dolma escaped from Tibet in 1959 and made Dharmsala her home. She says she wishes to visit Tibet someday.
SOLD PHOTO 5 Sonam Dolma, 75, poses near a prayer wheel in Dharamsala, India. Dolma escaped from Tibet in 1959 and made Dharmsala her home. She says she wishes to visit Tibet someday.
An envelope with Mandarin prints that profile a photography company in Lhasa, is seen preserved by Tibetan exile Dolma Kyi, 21, after she received a letter from her family in it in New Delhi, India. Kyi escaped from Tibet in 2001 when she was around 8 years old. She says she missed her parents most while still in school and other students would have their parents visiting them.
SOLD PHOTO 6 An envelope with Mandarin prints that profile a photography company in Lhasa, is seen preserved by Tibetan exile Dolma Kyi, 21, after she received a letter from her family in it in New Delhi, India. Kyi escaped from Tibet in 2001 when she was around 8 years old. She says she missed her parents most while still in school and other students would have their parents visiting them.
A coral and turquoise stones that belonged to Tsetan Kalsang's mother are held strung together in New Delhi, India. Kalsang escaped into India in 2004 with the help of her brother, who returned to Tibet after safely transporting her across the border into Nepal. Her mother died a few months later in Tibet and she received the stones as keepsake. Kalsang said she felt alone she had tp make crucial life after she started attending college and missed the support of family.
SOLD PHOTO 7 A coral and turquoise stones that belonged to Tsetan Kalsang’s mother are held strung together in New Delhi, India. Kalsang escaped into India in 2004 with the help of her brother, who returned to Tibet after safely transporting her across the border into Nepal. Her mother died a few months later in Tibet and she received the stones as keepsake. Kalsang said she felt alone she had tp make crucial life after she started attending college and missed the support of family.)
A young Tibetan exile Pema Lhamo, 8, fits herself into a box to enact her escape scene, in Dharmsala, India. Lhamo fled to India when she was 3 years old in a box and now lives with her grandmother. She is presently studying in a Tibetan Children's Village School.
SOLD PHOTO 8 A young Tibetan exile Pema Lhamo, 8, fits herself into a box to enact her escape scene, in Dharmsala, India. Lhamo fled to India when she was 3 years old in a box and now lives with her grandmother. She is presently studying in a Tibetan Children’s Village School.
A car moves on a serpentine road past snow-capped peaks near Zoji La in Indian-Kashmir, India. Many Tibetans say that being in the mountains make them miss their homeland.
SOLD PHOTO 9 A car moves on a serpentine road past snow-capped peaks near Zoji La in Indian-Kashmir, India. Many Tibetans say that being in the mountains make them miss their homeland.
Tibetan monk Dorjee, 38, displays a photograph of his father, left, and himself, center, taken in Tibet, in Dharamsala, India. Dorjee said he held back his tears when he spoke with his parents on the phone after a separation period of 27 years. He exchanged a few words with his father but said his mother fainted on hearing his voice.
PHOTO 10 Tibetan monk Dorjee, 38, displays a photograph of his father, left, and himself, center, taken in Tibet, in Dharamsala, India. Dorjee said he held back his tears when he spoke with his parents on the phone after a separation period of 27 years. He exchanged a few words with his father but said his mother fainted on hearing his voice.

Select a photo (price includes postage*)




*Includes UK postage, please email [email protected] if you are overseas.

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